Oct
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Nov
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Dec
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Jan
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Feb
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
Mar
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Apr
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
May
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Jun
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Jul
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
StartseiteHome Carl Heinrich Reinecke: Orchestral Works Vol. 1

Carl Heinrich Reinecke: Orchestral Works Vol. 1

Carl Heinrich Reinecke: Orchestral Works Vol. 1

Carl Heinrich Reinecke’s Orchestral Works Vol. 1

Carl Reineckes Symphony No. 3 formed the rousing finale of his era as a conductor at the Gewandhaus in Leipzig. Reinecke never defended himself verbally against charges by his contemporaries that he was a “conventional composer”; instead, he shared the opinion of his critics, stating that he had “never had the audacity to regard himself as a trailblazing genius.” Musically, however, he puts an immediate end to all clichés. Without holding things up with a slow introduction, he has the first movement of his op. 227 storm ahead on its path, full of élan, with defiant chordal beats, driven by syncopated rhythms, and for a time offering space for lyrical secondary ideas. And he offers an extremely rich arsenal of powerful orchestral parts.

His Symphony No. 1 in A major was performed six times between 1858 and 1892, which means more than any other symphony by him at the Gewandhaus. It has a slow introduction leading seamlessly into the first allegro, an andante greeting Mendelssohn and Schumann, and a robust scherzo framed by a melancholy and delicate trio and in its coda announcing the clarinet solo introducing the finale, and it was in revised form that Reinecke again included it on the Gewandhaus program on 22 October 1863.

With his radiant and splendid Triumphal March op. 110 this master of large-scale symphonies and operas, virtuosic instrumental concertos, sophisticated piano and chamber music, and warm-hearted and playful compositions for children shows that he can also serve up pomp and showy brilliance in keeping with the genre and the occasion and ignite a four-minute firework of sumptuous brass orchestral opulence with “fiery passion and festive spirit.”

Content of the CD

Symphony No. 1 A major, op. 79

Symphony No. 3 G minor, op. 227

Overture, Romance & Prelude to Act 5 from “King Manfred”, op. 93

Triumphal March, op. 110

performers

Munich Radio Orchestra

Henry Raudales, violin & direction

May 2020
1 CD, cpo 6100112

 

Back to the overview

Our site uses cookies to individually display content and measure reach. We incorporate third-party elements such as Facebook and Youtube. Please see our Privacy Policy for details.

OK